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MAWCA

The Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association

MAWCA 2022 PROGRAM

Friday, Apr 1, 2022

4:00-4:30 pm Registration

Tawes Lobby

4:30-6:00 pm  Featured Workshop with Dr. Leigh Ryan

From “What is a Writing Center?” To “What’s New in the Writing Center?”: Our Past, Present, and Future

Room 1310

Note: This session is accessible in person and as a live stream via Zoom. A link will be provided.

We will look briefly at the history of writing centers, then examine where we are now, and finally consider where we are or might be headed.  How will we function within our tutors’ academic lives, as part of an academic community, and as part of an increasingly professional field of national and international writing centers?

6:00-7:00 pm Reception

7:00pm MAWCA Board Meeting

Online Asynchronous Works-in-Progress Presentations

Room 1221, Room 1123

Links will be provided to access these presentations, as well as materials from other online presentations. If you are attending the conference in person, feel free to use Rooms 1221 and 1123, which are available as spaces to sit and log in to the online portions of the conference.

Reducing "Zoom Fatigue" in Writing Centers

Julie Short, James Madison University

Student Narrations of Interpersonal Relationships and the Writing Process: A Qualitative Study

Gina Mingoia, Long Island University Post

Impacts of Implicit Bias in the Writing Center

Ysa Fernandez, Pennsylvania State University

Beyond “That’s the Rule:” Assessing and Developing UMD Writing Center Tutors’ Meta-Grammatical Understanding to Meet the Needs of English Language Learners in the Writing Center

MacKenzie Guthrie

Saturday, April 2, 2022

7:30-8:45 am Breakfast and Registration

Room 1310

9:00-9:15 am Opening Remarks by Dean of Undergraduate Studies Professor William Cohen, MAWCA President JennEfer Callaghan, and Local Conference Chairs

Room 1100

9:15-10:15 am Keynote Address: Lindsay Sabatino and Brian Fallon

“Transforming Practices: Writing Centers on the Edge of Now”

Room 1100

10:30-11:30 am Session A

A1 Developing an Assessment Plan Using Institutional Data

Room 3132

Workshop

Beth Towle and Stephanie Davis, Salisbury University

This workshop will help participants develop assessment plans in collaboration with institutional research offices. Participants will share their data collection and reporting practices, and work together to build stronger assessments.

A2 Literacy and Identity in Multilingual Writing Center Sessions

Room 1107

Panel

Negotiating Difference: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Writing Center Interactions between Peer Tutors and Multilingual Tutees

Lisa DiMaio, Drexel University

In sharing the results of her qualitative study that explored how peer tutors and multilingual tutees negotiated difference, the speaker will discuss how the interactions revealed inequalities in power and authority.

Fostering Multilingual Writers’ Identity in the Writing Center: A Study of the ESOL Opt-In Program

Idée Edalatishams, Janalyn Miklas, and Kendall Bryant, George Mason University

Multilingual graduate writers constantly negotiate their identity as writers, scholars, and individuals. This study examines writers’ perceived identities as they develop their writing skills in a Writing Center ESOL program.

Tutors' and Spanish-Speaking Tutees' Dispositions Toward Literacy and How Those Dispositions Affect their Experiences in the Writing Center

Marina Ellis, University of Maryland, College Park

This presentation will discuss initial findings of a narrative-inquiry based study into tutors' and Spanish-speaking tutees' dispositions toward literacy and their effect on the experiences they have in the writing center.


A3 The Emotional Work of Writing Center Consultations

Room 1106

Panel

Sharing That Piece of Ourselves: Confronting the Apprehension of Consulting Sessions

Ozioma Ikejiani, George Washington University

Fear. Anxiety. Apprehension. Writers feel such emotions when working on their papers. This project acknowledges and evaluates ways consultants navigate writers’ apprehension, and how consultants promote self-confidence throughout their sessions.

For Impostors, By Impostors: Community-Engaged Research to Mitigate Impostor Phenomenon Prevalence in Peer Tutors

Jurnee Louder, The George Washington University

With an interest in impostor phenomenon (IP), I will present findings from my study of the prevalence of IP in tutors within my writing center and discuss a possible intervention.

A4 Trauma-Informed Pedagogies

Room 1105

Panel

Training Tutors to be Trauma-sensitive

Seeda Henderson Williams, Towson University

Trauma-informed pedagogy is a theoretical framework that creates equitable education by giving students access to individualized instruction that considers their social context and emotional well-being. This theory maintains that the emotional, mental, and social well-being of students should be addressed as part of their learning to ensure successful development. The presenter will share their experience of researching and creating practical trauma-informed training to equip tutors to be trauma-sensitive.

How Writing Centers Can Address the Ongoing Mental Health Crisis in Universities

Tyler Bassett, University of Maryland, College Park

Writing centers are primarily focused on addressing student’s needs and offering help. However, perhaps the help that writing centers offer should be expanded, given the ongoing mental health crisis that is largely prevalent amongst college students and has only been worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. One such solution can be the adoption and advocation for writing based therapeutic practices by writing centers. These are accessible, low-cost, and can serve to help student’s writing, as well as their mental well-being and reduce the mental health crisis being experienced by students on their academic work.

A5 Online. Multimodal Composing, Linguistic Justice

Online Panel Presentation

Links will be provided to access these presentations, as well as materials from other online presentations. If you are attending the conference in person, feel free to use Rooms 1221 and 1123, which are available as spaces to sit and log in to the online portions of the conference.

Multimodal Composing in the Writing Center: Tutor Training for Media Studies Assignments

Kerri Rinaldi and Kelly George, Immaculata University

How can a writing center at a small, liberal arts college best equip students and peer tutors for multimodal composition? This presentation examines the benefits and challenges of a course-based collaboration with media studies faculty.

Linguistic Justice: Sustainable Change and Ongoing Conversations

Elise Romero, University of Pittsburgh

How do we honor linguistic justice without jeopardizing a tutees ability to succeed in a world that expects White Mainstream English? Lasting solutions lie in uncomfortable conversations and honesty between tutors and tutees.

Bleeding Edge: The Manifesto as a Staff Development Tool

Tyler Thier, Hofstra University

Manifestos start with the individual in relation to oppressive systems. They end with a blueprint for liberation. How can they be implemented in staff development as a tool for empathy?

11:30-12:30 - Session B

B1 Works-in-Progress Session

Room 1107

Design Thinking: Serving the Whole Student

Susan Edele, Lindenwood University

Community Writing Centers and Social Change

Erin Green, University of Maryland, College Park

The Influence of Native Language and Culture on Multilingual Writing in the US Academia

Vanessa Petroj and Jen Callaghan, Bryn Mawr College

Antiracism and Linguistic Justice at the Writing Center

Faith Sears, University of Maryland, College Park

Optimizing Writing Centers for Nursing Students

Emma Simpson, York College of Pennsylvania

Understanding the Experience of Required Writing Center Visits for Writing Studio Students and Their Tutors

Eva Savill, York College of Pennsylvania

B2 Ethics Boards in the Writing Center: Conflict Resolution by and for Writing Center Staff 

Room 3132

Workshop

Aaron Datta and Shree Venkataraman, The George Washington University

This workshop will discuss how to implement ethical writing center practices using a restorative justice system by examining the GWU writing center’s proposed ethics board and relevant case studies.

B3 What Comes to the Writing Center? An Analysis of Research Genres

Room 1105

Panel

Margaret Ervin, Gabrielle Stanley, and Olivia Mathers, West Chester University

Our tutors recorded and coded the “research” sub-genres students brought to our center. Our analysis helps us focus on how best to help writers meet genre expectations that are often not spelled out in the assignment.

B4 Supporting Individual Writers

Room 1106

Panel

A Longitudinal Approach to Undergraduate Writers and the Impact of Self-Efficacy

Kaitlin Quigley, Loyola University Maryland

Considering the importance of inviting the “whole person” into the writing center, this research examines the relationship between self-efficacy and presented ability throughout the course of a writer’s undergraduate career.

Helping Security Leaders Become More Secure in their Writing

Karissa Wojcik and May Chung, National Defense University

This presentation offers strategies to help students work through writing anxieties. Our goal is to nurture military and security leaders for their next mission: to become more secure writers.

Viewing Tutors as a Teacher Resource

Kathryn Salada, Pennsylvania State University

A discussion on how to shift the educational conversation to include tutors and recognize their potential to supplement the efforts of the overworked educators.

B5 Online. Building Communities of Practice: New Training Paradigms Post-Covid

Online Panel Presentation

Links will be provided to access these presentations, as well as materials from other online presentations. If you are attending the conference in person, feel free to use Rooms 1221 and 1123, which are available as spaces to sit and log in to the online portions of the conference.

Carmen Meza,  Mairin Barney, and Nyla Green,  Towson University

This panel will use a community of practice framework to launch discussion about the ways in which writing centers can foster a community of learning and teaching through unified training models. Participants will learn about 3 different training contexts: Graduate Consultant Workshop, Writing Fellows and Faculty Partner Training, and Undergraduate Writing Assistant Training.

12:30-1:30 pm Lunch

1:30-2:30 pm Session C

C1 Disability and Accessibility in the Writing Center

Room 1105

Panel

When Disclosure Feels Like Duty: Negotiating Writing Center Consultants' Disabled Identity within the Context of the Writing Center and Writing Center Research

Allison Stanich, George Mason University

This session aims to discuss the challenges disabled writing center consultants may face as they navigate sessions relating to disclosure from the perspective of a passing disabled writing center consultant.

Doing it Blindly: How Tutoring Can Be More Accessible for Low-Vision Learners

Brianna Broadwater, Rowan University

This presentation shares techniques that can be implemented to best help students with visual impairments in the writing center. How can we support students in virtual platforms where they might be using screenreaders, text-to-speech or other methods? What might we need to change in our current practices in order to ensure that students who are visually impaired feel comfortable and supported in the writing center?

C2 Re-envisioning Future Writing Center Sites and Methods

Room 1107

Panel

Samaa Gamie, Dajah Burrows, Ezekiel Quattlebaum, and Tamia Lawrence, Lincoln University of Pennsylvania

By re-envisioning WC practices and services, WC practitioners can empower minority students to challenge and resist the racist linguistic, ideological, and socio-economic systems that disenfranchise them or affirm their marginality.

C3 Multilingual Consultants in the Writing Center

Room 1106

Panel

Multilingualism in the George Washington University Writing Center

Yonatan Altman-Shafer and Isabel Duarte, The George Washington University

As multilingual consultants ourselves, we discuss how to approach sessions with multilingual and/or ESL students to maximize their writing experiences in a Writing Center environment.

The Role of Shared Languages in Writing Centers: Encouraging Multilingual Sessions

Vivian Kong, George Washington University

There is a lack of attention in Writing Studies on multilingual consultants interacting with multilingual clients. I contend multilingual sessions have significant advantages without hindering client immersion in Standard English.

For Impostors, By Impostors: Community-Engaged Research to Mitigate Impostor Phenomenon Prevalence in Peer Tutors

Jurnee Louder, The George Washington University

With an interest in impostor phenomenon (IP), I will present findings from my study of the prevalence of IP in tutors within my writing center and discuss a possible intervention.


C4 Overwhelming Prompts

Room 3132

Workshop

Vanessa Petroj, Anna Hsu, Arya Yue, Katherine Santarpia, and Linda Chen, Bryn Mawr College

Our workshop offers a window into the challenges that international and/or multilingual students face when looking at a writing prompt. We offer five writing prompts across different disciplines that include less familiar socio-political, literary, and popular topics from cultures across the world, as well as translanguaging.

C5 Online. "We're Back Now, Right?": Restoring Face-to-Face Tutoring in the (Post?) COVID-19 Era

Online Panel Presentation

Links will be provided to access these presentations, as well as materials from other online presentations. If you are attending the conference in person, feel free to use Rooms 1221 and 1123, which are available as spaces to sit and log in to the online portions of the conference.

Brennan Thomas, Alyssa Baxter, Sarah Klein, and Scott Riner,  St. Francis University

This panel examines how our tutors have adapted tutorial methods to accommodate our constituency's COVID-19-related concerns of accessibility, ease, and mental health following the full restoration of our face-to-face services.

2:30-3:30 pm Session D

D1 - MAWCA Board Meet & Greet

Room 1107

Roundtable

Jen Callaghan, President of MAWCA, Bryn Mawr College

Join Executive Board members for an informal conversation about ways MAWCA can support its members.

D2 A Different Approach to Teaching Punctuation

Room 3132

Workshop

Maureen Roult, University of Maryland, College Park

This workshop will address teaching punctuation by relating it to suprasegmentals (pitch, tempo, pauses, etc.), with the input to be used to train tutors in explaining punctuation to students.

D3 Supporting Multilingual Writers in the University

Room 1105

Panel

Writers, Tutors, and Professors: Supporting Multilingual Writers Within the University

Caitlin Garrett, The George Washington University

This presentation will investigate the triangulation between multilingual writers, tutors, and faculty regarding dominant language conventions and explore how we can consult multilingual writers ethically and effectively.

An Investigation of Curriculums and Programming that Serve Multilingual Students: Is it Working?

Aisha Veras, Loyola University

This project explores the negative biases professors hold towards multilingual writers while investigating different programming and resources for multilingual students at a local university in Maryland.

D4 Online - Virtually the Same (or Not?): Considering New Directions in the Writing Center

Online Panel Presentation

Links will be provided to access these presentations, as well as materials from other online presentations. If you are attending the conference in person, feel free to use Rooms 1221 and 1123, which are available as spaces to sit and log in to the online portions of the conference.

Jennifer Marx, Michael Heiss, Marylin Buono-Magri, and Aisha Wilson-Carter, Hofstra University

This presentation considers how writing centers can build equitable programs that maintain the benefits of in-person support while promoting the inclusivity and work-life balance that online tutoring invites.

D5 Online - Developing Flexible Approaches to Writing Center Work

Links will be provided to access these presentations, as well as materials from other online presentations. If you are attending the conference in person, feel free to use Rooms 1221 and 1123, which are available as spaces to sit and log in to the online portions of the conference.

HOWLing for Student Success: Leveraging LibWizard and Structured Feedback Forms to Enhance Asynchronous Writing Tutoring

Robin Edwards and Kim Mong, Harrisburg Area Community College

How one two-year college implemented LibWizard as a mechanism for submitting writing assignments and providing consistently structured feedback in asynchronous tutoring sessions. 

Agility in Our Pandemic World: A Call for Hybrid Outreach Approaches to Enhance Writing Center Spaces

Tara Friedman and Patricia Dyer, Widener University

We aim to address how a hybrid approach to writing center outreach best sustains our ethos of agility. We outline our current efforts of expanded outreach, including evening presentations, Q&A sessions, and small working groups, and detail future plans of expansion, such as an e-newsletter and short tutorial videos, as we formulate ideas on the writer center’s future spaces. 


MAWCA is a 501(c)(3) tax exempt public charity. 
Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association

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